How does the addition of a solute affect boiling point?

How does the addition of a solute affect boiling point?

The decrease in the vapor pressure of the solvent that occurs when a solute is added to the solvent causes an increase in the boiling point and decrease in the melting point of the solution. According to this figure, the solution can't boil at the same temperature as the pure solvent.

How does the addition of a solute affect the boiling point the freezing point and the vapor pressure of the solvent?

When we dissolve a non-ionic solute in a solvent, the boiling point of the solvent INCREASES by an amount proportional to the mole fraction of the solute. And likewise, the freezing point of the solution DECREASES by an amount proportional to the mole fraction of the solute.

Why the boiling point changes upon addition of the solute to the solvent?

The boiling point of a solution, then, will be greater than the boiling point of the pure solvent because the solution (which has a lower vapor pressure) will need to be heated to a higher temperature in order for the vapor pressure to become equal to the external pressure (i.e., the boiling point).

What effect does adding a solute have on the boiling point of a solution apex?

This is true for any solute added to a solvent; the boiling point will be higher than the boiling point of the pure solvent (without the solute). In other words, when anything is dissolved in water, the solution will boil at a higher temperature than pure water would.

How does adding a solute affect freezing point?

The presence of a solute lowers the freezing point of any solvent; this effect is called freezing-point depression. The key to understanding this effect is that the solute is present in the liquid solution, but not in the pure solid solvent.